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Curriculum Design and Delivery procedure

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Section 1 - Preamble

(1) This Procedure is effective from 15 August 2022.

(2) This Procedure incorporates the Academic Staff Qualifications and Equivalences Framework set out at Section 6.

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Section 2 - Purpose

(3) This Procedure sets out the processes that apply to the development and delivery of courses, units and micro-units.

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Section 3 - Scope

(4) This Procedure applies to higher education award courses, units and micro-units offered by the University.

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Section 4 - Policy

(5) This Procedure is pursuant to the Higher Education Courses policy.

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Section 5 - Procedure

Courses

Roles and responsibilities

(6) Course teams are assigned by the Head of Academic Unit (approved by the Faculty Board) for each course or group of courses to coordinate their design, ongoing development and review. Course teams comprise:

  1. at least four continuing or fixed-term (three years or more) Academic staff members teaching components of the course, including representatives from each campus on which the course is offered and at least one active researcher
  2. other staff who support course design and delivery as appropriate.

(7) A Course Director is assigned by the Head of Academic Unit (approved by the Faculty Board) as the leading academic member of each course team. Course Directors are responsible for ensuring that the requirements of the Higher Education Courses policy and associated procedures, and professional accreditation requirements are met.

(8) Casual Academic staff or external specialists may be appointed to contribute to the design and/or delivery of courses or units under the guidance and supervision of Course Directors or Unit Chairs. Casual Academic staff who teach for at least one teaching period within an Academic Year will have access to learning and development activities in accordance with the Staff Development policy.

(9) Course Directors, Unit Chairs (see clause 32) and other staff with responsibilities for academic oversight, teaching and assessment in a course or component of a course will have:

  1. appropriate qualifications or equivalent experience (assessed in accordance with the Academic Staff Qualifications and Equivalence Framework in Schedule A)
  2. skills in contemporary teaching, learning and assessment relevant to their role, the discipline, modes of delivery and the needs of particular student cohorts.

Course design

(10) Courses are designed in accordance with the:

  1. principles set out in the Higher Education Courses policy (including the Deakin Curriculum Framework)
  2. requirements for design and delivery set out in this Procedure
  3. requirements of the Assessment (Higher Education Courses) procedure
  4. requirements of the Higher Degrees by Research (HDR) policy and procedures (where relevant)
  5. requirements of external accreditation bodies (where relevant)
  6. in the case of joint and dual courses, any additional principles or requirements agreed with partner institution/s in accordance with agreements approved under the Academic Partnerships procedure or Higher Degrees by Research (HDR) Partnership procedure.

(11) The design for each course (including nested courses) includes the following:

  1. award to be conferred on completion (named in accordance with the Academic Awards procedure)
  2. academic calendar that will be used to deliver the course
  3. duration, including:
    1. years of full- and/or part-time study
    2. whether study is required in particular trimesters or other approved periods
    3. maximum period of study
  4. structure and sequence, including:
    1. required and elective units that comprise the course
    2. majors, minors or specialisations
  5. location of delivery (including online)
  6. admission criteria and pathways
  7. expected learning outcomes (aligned to the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) and professional or discipline standards where relevant)
  8. methods of assessment
  9. indicative student workload (typically 150 hours per credit point)
  10. requirements for participation in compulsory learning and other activities at a physical site or online
  11. compulsory requirements for completion
  12. exit pathways (including undergraduate early exit diplomas) and pathways to further learning
  13. for Bachelor Honours or postgraduate programs, the proportion and nature of research or research-related study in the course.

(12) Bachelor Degrees will include:

  1. a maximum of 10 credit points at level 1
  2. for a three-year course, a minimum of 6 credit points at level 3 or above
  3. for a four-year course, a minimum of 10 credit points at level 3 or above.

(13) Course approval documentation will provide sufficient detail to allow a judgement to be made on the standing and quality of the course and allow prospective students to compare comparable offerings from different providers.

(14) All courses include compulsory learning experiences for students to develop an understanding of the principles of academic and (where relevant) research integrity and how to apply them to their learning and assessment. This will include academic integrity training at the beginning of the first year of the course and further development in later years (in accordance with the Student Academic Integrity procedure).

(15) All Bachelor Degrees include opportunities for one or more of the following work-integrated learning experiences directed by the University:

  1. work placements (such as industry-based learning, internships and practicums)
  2. workplace audits
  3. field trips
  4. simulations
  5. studios
  6. complex labs and problem-based learning with industry partners
  7. industry input on student projects
  8. project work developed with or commissioned by industry
  9. other work-integrated learning experiences approved by the Faculty Board.

(16) Courses that are delivered in accordance with the Trimester Academic Calendar make use of the trimester system to enhance student flexibility in relation to study load and study duration. To shorten the duration of particular courses, study in all three trimesters may be required.

(17) Courses are structured to:

  1. build the academic skills of students in transition into the University learning environment
  2. scaffold progress towards the achievement of expected course learning outcomes
  3. monitor student progress, and
  4. manage learning workload.

Majors, minors and specialisations

(18) Sequences of units that constitute majors, minors or specialisations may be included in one or more courses as follows:

Sequence Credit points
Bachelor Degree major 6-8, with at least 2 credit points in each of levels 2 and 3 of the course
Bachelor Degree minor 4
Masters Degree (Coursework) specialisation 4-8

(19) Where possible courses should be designed to enable students to complete a coherent secondary sequence of study in addition to their primary field of study, including a sequence from another faculty.

(20) Majors, minors and specialisations:

  1. form coherent sequences of study in a field of study
  2. recognise depth of learning in the field of study
  3. contribute to the achievement of course learning outcomes, and
  4. are assigned names that clearly indicate the field of study.

Bachelor Honours Degrees

(21) A Bachelor Honours Degree may be:

  1. an independent course that students enter following completion of a Bachelor Degree in a related discipline ('end-on'), or
  2. integrated in a Bachelor Degree with:
    1. entry following completion of part of a related Bachelor Degree (typically two full-time years of study)
    2. entry directly into the Bachelor Honours Degree, with or without an option to exit with a related Bachelor Degree.

(22) All Bachelor Honours Degrees include project work and/or research and scholarship executed by students with some independence.

Masters Degrees by coursework

(23) The duration of Masters Degrees by coursework may vary depending on their admission criteria and purpose.

(24) Unless otherwise approved by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic, or if restrictions apply due to external accreditation requirements, Masters Degrees by coursework:

  1. have at least one nested Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma as an entry and/or exit point, where required units of nested courses:
    1. are required units of the associated Masters course and/or
    2. contribute to a specialisation in the Masters course
  2. have at least two possible admission periods each year.

(25) All Masters Degrees by coursework include some form of learning activity that develops knowledge of research methods and principles appropriate to the discipline, field of work or professional practice. Such a learning activity would typically include a research-based project, capstone experience and/or a piece of scholarship.

(26) Masters Degrees (Extended) include a significant proportion of practice-related learning developed in collaboration with a relevant professional, statutory or regulatory body.

Combined or dual degrees

(27) Combined or dual Bachelor and Masters by Coursework Degrees may be offered in different or related disciplines with reciprocal credit arrangements in accordance with the Recognition of Prior Learning policy. They may include courses at different levels of the AQF.

Micro-credentials

(28) Micro-credentials are awarded by the University in accordance with the Micro-credentials policy.

Stackable learning courses

(29) Stackable learning courses are designated courses designed to allow or require the attainment of Deakin micro-credentials that recognise achievement of learning in accordance with the Micro-credentials policy.

(30) Principles for the design of stackable learning courses are approved by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic.

(31) For courses that integrate Deakin Professional Practice credentials, students must complete specified preparatory and capstone units as approved by Academic Board.

Variations to course requirements

(32) Variations to course requirements for individual students may only be made in exceptional circumstances where approved by the Faculty Executive Dean (or nominated Associate/Deputy Dean) in consultation with the Course Director. Decisions must take into consideration professional accreditation requirements.

Units

Roles and responsibilities

(33) For each unit, excluding micro-units, a Unit Chair is assigned by the Head of Academic Unit (approved by the Faculty Board) for each period of study that the unit is delivered. Unit Chairs are continuing or fixed term (three years or more) Academic staff members and are responsible for coordinating the curriculum, teaching and assessment in a unit. In exceptional circumstances, the Executive Dean may temporarily assign another appropriately qualified staff member to carry out the responsibilities of a Unit Chair with appropriate guidance and support.

Unit design

(34) Courses include units that are either required or elective. To graduate students must successfully complete all required units and any specified electives for their course. Elective units may be chosen from:

  1. all units offered by the University (open elective), or
  2. a selection of units specified as part of the course structure (course elective).

(35) Each unit enables students to achieve clearly articulated learning outcomes that contribute to the achievement of the Deakin Graduate Learning Outcomes (set out in the Higher Education Courses policy) and course learning outcomes.

(36) The design for each unit includes:

  1. a succinct name that clearly indicates the content to staff and students
  2. credit point value (typically one credit point, although larger integrated learning experiences may be worth two to four credit points and mandatory requirements, such as laboratory safety and academic integrity training, may not be credit bearing. Micro-units may be 0.5 or one credit point)
  3. any unit pre-requisites, co-requisites or incompatibilities
  4. scope of content
  5. learning outcomes and their alignment to relevant Deakin Graduate Learning Outcomes (set out in the Higher Education Courses policy), course learning outcomes and assessment
  6. the assessment tasks for the unit including type, grading, weighting and hurdle requirements
  7. mode/s of delivery
  8. when and where the unit is offered
  9. learning experiences, including typical workload and timetabled learning activities
  10. any requirements to attend a physical location for course-related activities (including by online students at examinations and intensive sessions)
  11. teaching and learning resources
  12. any equipment requirements in addition to standard University requirements (including computing and connectivity requirements).

(37) Units may be designated to identify their role in supporting student progress and achievement through the course and/or the nature of learning activities as follows:

  1. Role in supporting progress and achievement
    1. Foundation unit — to support student transition by building foundation knowledge and skills and providing an introduction to the field
    2. Milestone unit — to provide students with opportunities at key stages of the course to integrate their learning and reflect on evidence of their progress and career aspirations
    3. Capstone unit — to provide students with opportunities at the end of the course to integrate their learning, demonstrate achievement of course learning outcomes and reflect on their career aspirations
  2. Nature of learning activities
    1. Work-integrated learning unit (including placement units)
    2. Research unit
    3. Research-related study unit
    4. Taught and assessed micro-unit
    5. Professional Practice micro-unit

(38) The proportion of units of a course that are at the AQF level of the award that will be conferred may vary but must be sufficient to enable students to develop their knowledge, skills and application of knowledge and skills to enable them to achieve the course learning outcomes.

Micro-units

Roles and responsibilities

(39) Specific curriculum design and delivery requirements and responsibilities for micro-units, excluding Deakin Professional Practice Credentials, will be determined by the Deputy-Vice Chancellor Academic and will:

  1. ensure that the academic integrity of the micro-unit and destination degrees is maintained
  2. maintain flexibility and efficiency in the delivery of micro-units
  3. be scaled to be commensurate with the volume of learning and the delivery models for micro-units.

Micro-unit design

(40) Micro-units are a type of unit with clearly articulated learning outcomes which are assessed and that lead to the award of a micro-credential.

(41) Micro-units may:

  1. be taught and assessed
  2. be assessed only (professional practice micro-units)
  3. have a credit point value of 0.5 credit points or 1.

(42) All micro-units:

  1. include assessments approved and supervised by the University
  2. are aligned with the Australian Qualifications Framework and/or internationally recognised industry skills frameworks (as appropriate)
  3. may be integrated into the structure of specified award courses offered by the University
  4. may provide credit into other courses offered by the University
  5. may be delivered using the Start Anytime academic calendar.

(43) For each micro-unit, an Academic Overseer is assigned by the Head of Academic Unit (approved by the Faculty Board) for each period of study that the micro-unit is delivered. The role of micro-unit Academic Overseers will be determined in accordance with clause 39.

Taught and assessed micro-units

(44) Taught and assessed micro-units:

  1. are offered as short courses by the University only or in partnership
  2. are designed to warrant learning that is taught and assessed
  3. allow flexible types of delivery, including micro-classes, masterclasses and professional learning micro-classes.

Professional practice micro-units

(45) Professional practice micro-units:

  1. are designed to warrant learning that is gained through significant industry experience
  2. do not include a taught component
  3. lead to the award of a Deakin Professional Practice credential.

(46) Standards and responsibilities for design, delivery and assessment for professional practice micro-units and Deakin Professional Practice credentials are specified in the Deakin Professional Practice Credentials procedure.

Course Delivery

Language of delivery

(47) All teaching, learning and assessment is in English unless:

  1. another language is used to develop or assess proficiency in that other language, or
  2. the use of another language is otherwise approved by the Academic Board.

Delivery

(48) Courses and units may be delivered at campuses or other sites or online (where approved under the Higher Education Courses Approval and Review procedure) as follows:

Campus delivery The course is delivered through learning experiences at Deakin’s campuses or other sites. Students will also have access to online learning resources and experiences.
Online delivery The course is delivered through online learning experiences. Students may be required to attend a designated physical site for some assessment and learning tasks.

(49) Students enrol in a course at an approved campus or site or online in accordance with the Admission Process, Enrolment, Fees and Charges procedure. Where course rules allow, students enrolled at a campus or site may elect to study individual units online and students enrolled online may elect to study individual units at a campus or site.  

(50) For the purposes of compliance with the requirements of the National Code under the Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS) Act 2000, students studying in Australia on student visas must be able to undertake at least two thirds of the units in their course at a campus or other site and at least one unit at a campus or other site in any compulsory study period, except where the student is undertaking the final unit of their course. Study plans will be developed for each of these students to ensure that they can meet their visa requirements and complete within the expected duration as listed on their Confirmation of Enrolment.

(51) For the purposes of calculating the percentage of units delivered at a campus or other site, or online, units are classified according to their dominant mode of delivery as follows:

Campus delivery More than half of scheduled learning activities are at a campus or other sites. For this purpose, learning activities include lectures, seminars, regular consultations and supervised activities at a physical site (including practical and professionals experiences such as placements, field trips, study tours and research activities). Students will also have access to online learning resources and experiences.
Online delivery More than half of the scheduled learning activities entail online learning resources and experiences. There may be some compulsory contact hours and students may be required to attend a designated site for some assessment and learning tasks.

Academic calendars

(52) Award courses are delivered during set study periods in accordance with academic calendars approved by the Academic Board. These calendars specify periods for teaching, independent study and assessment that maintain the integrity of the course and the quality of the student experience.

(53) The University’s standard academic calendar for courses is the Trimester Academic Calendar which specifies, for each academic year, three periods of 15 weeks, comprising:

  1. up to 11 weeks of facilitated learning experiences
  2. an intra-trimester break of at least one week
  3. a period for independent study of at least three working days at the end of the last week of teaching
  4. an assessment period of at least seven working days.

(54) Other academic calendars may be approved by the Academic Board for specific courses or year levels of courses where the Trimester Academic Calendar is not suitable for one or more of the following reasons:

  1. the Trimester Academic Calendar does not enable the University to meet external professional accreditation requirements
  2. required learning experiences cannot be conducted within the Trimester Academic Calendar for reasons outside the University’s control
  3. a non-standard academic calendar would enable the recruitment or admission of target student cohorts (including students studying at an offshore location where a different calendar is generally used)
  4. there are other compelling reason/s why the adoption of a non-standard academic calendar would advance the University’s strategic agenda.

(55) Where the Trimester Academic Calendar is not appropriate, where possible a standard Semester Academic Calendar should be used which would typically include, for each academic year, two periods of 20 weeks, including:

  1. up to 16 weeks of facilitated learning experiences
  2. an intra-trimester break
  3. a period for independent study of at least five working days at the end of the last week of teaching
  4. an assessment period of at least seven working days.

(56) Approval for a course to be delivered using an academic calendar other than the Trimester Academic Calendar must be sought in accordance with the Higher Education Courses Approval and Review procedure when a new course is approved or as a revision to an existing course.  Approval will require prior endorsement by the Academic Registrar.

(57) Academic calendar dates for courses are approved annually by the Academic Board, on the recommendation of the Academic Registrar, for future implementation at least two years in advance.

(58) Faculty Boards may approve the delivery of units within a course outside the approved academic calendar where compelling reasons can be established in accordance with clause 54, adequate pre-notification has been provided to students and the endorsement of the Academic Registrar has been obtained. This may include units involving student placements, field trips, intensives or other learning experiences that cannot be delivered within the approved academic calendar for the course.

(59) Faculty Boards may approve the delivery of units using the Start Anytime Calendar. Students may enrol in an approved unit of a course at any time during the year, with completion of each unit expected within 6 months or 12 months of enrolment in that unit, depending on the maximum period allowed for that unit or, for international students, by the course end date as listed on their Confirmation of Enrolment, whichever comes first.

Learning environments and activities

(60) Courses are delivered within a learning environment that provides all students with equitable and consistent access to facilities, infrastructure, resources and support to assist student progress and achievement of learning outcomes.

(61) Optimal use is made of Deakin’s campuses or other sites or online to deliver learning activities that support student achievement of learning outcomes.

(62) Terms used to describe learning activities at Deakin are:

  Term Description
a. Lecture Educators present learners with discipline knowledge, principles, and concepts through interactive lectures that structure and sequence learning. Learners engage in questions and answers, discussions, reflection, meaning-making and note-taking.
A lecture encourages learners to focus their activities and interactions on specific knowledge.
b. Seminar Educators facilitate active learning experiences, individually or collaboratively, that focus learners on the application of knowledge acquired prior to attending the seminar.
Seminars provide learners with opportunities to apply their newly acquired knowledge, principles, and concepts, usually to produce an outcome e.g., a decision, a product, design, or choice. They encourage learners to participate and interact with peers, educators and others in ways that develop and demonstrate their understanding and application of knowledge.
c. Practical Experience Educators facilitate experiential learning experiences to develop learners' proficiency and skill in a safe and interactive environment. Educators and learners often make use of specialist spaces, instruments, tools and technologies, and simulate the practical application of knowledge.
Practical experiences include laboratories, studios, simulations, field trips and study tours. In unit guides, the University Handbook and for timetabling purposes, the type of practical experience may be specified in parentheses e.g., ‘Practical experience (laboratory)’
d. Professional Experience Educators facilitate authentic, work-based learning at an indoor, outdoor, or online location with real-world consequences for the learner. Professional experiences combine theoretical and practical course components in workplace contexts. They advance the development of employability skills and complement other learning experiences, to ensure that Deakin graduates are work-ready and workplace-confident.
Professional experiences include site visits, internships, placements, practicums and community and service learning. In unit guides, the University Handbook and for timetabling purposes, the type of professional experience may be specified in parentheses e.g., ‘Professional experience (Site visit)
e. Assessment Educators set assessment tasks for learners to demonstrate achievement.
Formative assessments establish a shared understanding of learning in progress. Summative assessment tasks demonstrate and document achievement of learning outcomes.
f. Meeting Educators review work in progress, provide feedback and/or guide learners.
These meetings, generally between an educator and one or more learners, allow for the exchange of ideas by presenting drafts, providing and receiving feedback about new applications of knowledge, as well as responding to assessment tasks.
g. Guided Study Learners work through a series of structured learning experiences and formative assessment tasks designed by their educators.
Guided study develops and extends the application of knowledge by working with ideas, concepts, and principles before and after attending educator-facilitated learning experiences. Learners may also reflect upon knowledge gained, and complete formative assessments to receive feedback on their learning progress.
h. Pre-Assessment Practice Learners revise, practise and/or rehearse their performance of skills and demonstration of capabilities.
Pre-assessment practice provides an opportunity for reflection and self-assessment before a formal assurance of assessment for learning; it may also include opportunities for peer feedback and informal feedback from educators. Pre-assessment practice may be guided and prompted by educators or driven primarily by learners themselves.
i. Self-directed / Supervised Study Learners conduct independent study with limited and tapering guidance. Educators set criteria and provide feedback on learning.
Self-directed study is undertaken with limited direction from others. Supervised study involves engaging in a specialist learning, research and/or development activity with tapering guidance from a supervisor over the course of the study.
j. Peer / Group Meeting Learners meet to receive and provide feedback and/or guide peers in their learning experiences.
During peer/group meetings, learners exchange ideas, present drafts, provide and receive feedback about new applications of knowledge, and discuss and collaborate on group assessment tasks. This could occur in a conference or symposium format and may include meetings related to group assessments and peer-support activities such as PASS (peer-assisted study sessions).

(63) Learning activities at a campus or other site may be conducted regularly throughout a study period or as an extended intensive session that may require overnight attendance (‘residential’).

(64) Where possible, learning activities should use resources available within the University. Students may be required to purchase specialised equipment, software or other resources providing they are informed about these additional costs before enrolment in the course or elective unit and the resources will be useful for professional practice.

(65) Units are designed and delivered in accordance with standards specified in clause 35-38.

(66) An equitable opportunity to participate in timetabled learning activities is provided regardless of whether the learning activities is delivered online or at a campus or other site.

(67) Learning spaces online or at a campus or other site are equipped with appropriate technology to enable student learning and support their achievement of course learning outcomes. The University adopts digital platforms, devices and/or tools to make student learning effective, engaging, efficient and accessible and adheres to Digital Accessibility Guidelines.

(68) The Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic will publish annually, in a prominent position on the University's public website, information on the following requirements for effective study at the University:

  1. access to computer devices
  2. connectivity to the internet
  3. capability to use the University's online learning environment.

(69) Research conducted in a Bachelor Honours Degree or Coursework Unit is delivered in accordance with the Research in Honours and Coursework Units procedure.

Third party arrangements

(70) Where courses, components of courses, learning resources or student support are delivered or provided by or with partner institutions, the University assures the quality of student experiences in accordance with the Academic Partnerships procedure, the Student Placement procedure or the Higher Degrees by Research (HDR) Partnership procedure (as appropriate).

Communicating course information to students

(71) Faculties are responsible for implementing quality assurance processes to ensure that information for prospective and current students about courses, units and other course components (e.g. professional practice credentials) meets the standards specified in the Student Communication and Information policy.

(72) Information that must be included in the University Handbook, the University’s public website, unit guides, and course and unit sites is specified below.

(73) Faculties will communicate changes to course and unit information to current or prospective students as soon as possible to ensure students have accurate and timely information for decision-making.

University Handbook

(74) Faculties will publish in the University Handbook and on the University’s public website information for prospective and current students about courses and units as follows:

  1. courses
    1. course design as set out in clause 11
    2. recognition by relevant professional bodies
    3. pathways to employment and eligibility for registration to practice (where applicable)
    4. approval status of the course
    5. whether the award conferred upon completion is recognised in the AQF
    6. whether the course is authorised to be offered to international students studying on an Australian student visa
  2. units
    1. unit design as set out in clause 22 (with the exception of teaching and learning resources)
    2. name of the Unit Chair.

Unit Guides

(75) Faculties will publish a Unit Guide for each study period in accordance with a template approved by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic or nominee. Unit Guides will be available to current students through the University's learning management system and will include the following information:

  1. unit learning outcomes and scope of content
  2. unit learning activities, including requirements for attendance at timetabled classes and seminars, and indicative workload
  3. unit assessment tasks including:
    1. clearly articulated assessment criteria for tasks that require the exercise of academic judgement
    2. alignment with the unit learning outcomes and Deakin Graduate Learning Outcomes set out in the Higher Education Courses policy
    3. due dates and other requirements
    4. any provision for negotiation of assessment tasks (e.g. allowing students to nominate topics) and a clear statement of the negotiation process
    5. rules on submission, including extensions, penalties for late submission and final submission date
    6. any hurdle requirements
    7. the period of time within which feedback is provided on assessment
  4. support available to students
  5. improvements made to the unit in response to student feedback.

(76) For micro-units, the format and content of the unit guide will be determined by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic, based on the unit requirements in clause 75.

Course and unit sites

(77) Faculties maintain course and unit online sites in the University's learning management system that include information for students in accordance with minimum standards that are set annually. The minimum standards for ‘course sites’ are set out at clause 78 and ‘unit sites’ are set out at clause 79.

(78) A course site may apply to a single course or suite of courses related to a discipline. At minimum, course sites will include the following elements.

Themes Requirements
Course team
  1. Contact details for Course Director(s)
  2. Listing of course team with Deakin Profile link
  3. How to contact course adviser(s)
Course or discipline information
  1. Welcome message from Course Director that fosters a sense of belonging and orients student to the course, course site, and course learning outcomes (as appears in the University Handbook)
  2. Link to course description on University website including:
    1. course requirements and options
    2. information about discipline majors and related studies 
    3. course pathways (student course study plans, core units, elective options, how to make decisions)
  3. Course external accreditation information (where relevant)
Course or discipline communication
  1. Course or discipline news, including information about relevant activities such as:
    1. events, seminars, workshops, placements
    2. topical issues
    3. conferences, projects, competitions, awards
    4. discussion forum that fosters peer-to-peer connection and communication
Student support
  1. Links to relevant study and student support services enabled by the University-wide Course site template. They include (but are not limited to):
    1. Library
    2. Student academic support (Academic Language, Learning and Peer Support)
    3. DUSA clubs and societies
    4. Mental health and well-being support (Disability Resource Centre)
Professional information and graduate employment
  1. Information and links to professional associations, industry and community connections
  2. Information about career planning and opportunities (including Deakin Talent)
  3. Career oriented information and activities, including work-integrated learning and career development learning
Site Design
  1. Clear navigation and layout through the use of the University-wide course home page template
  2. Visual identity as a course or discipline site to differentiate from unit sites and aligned to course information on public website
  3. Resources clearly organised and accessible with consistent formatting and descriptive file names

(79) Unit sites will meet the following minimum standards and work towards expected standards.

DeakinDesign Principles   Minimum standard Expected standard
Relational
Learning experiences promote relationships, connecting students to their discipline, others, space and place, strengthening communities and fostering belonging.
Welcome message from the teacher or teaching team is provided on homepage and includes teaching team’s contact details and photos.
Deakin provides Acknowledgement of Country which reflects the importance of Indigenous ways of knowing and expands on the meaning of place to include digitally constructed learning and teaching spaces.
The unit teacher/teaching team explains unit teaching approach, fostering a sense of belonging and connection.
The relevance of the learning activities to disciplinary and professional practice is explained, and opportunities to connect with industry and community are provided (e.g. DUSA student societies).
Digital
Learning experiences are digital by design; digital technologies are leveraged as core design elements to enable access, participation and support student success.
The unit site has clear navigation and layout that communicate learning and teaching expectations and sequence of learning, supported by the use of the University-wide CloudDeakin homepage template for consistency (reviewed annually).
The Unit Guide is located in the top-level module ‘Unit Guide and Information’. The Unit Guide should not change during teaching periods unless approved by Faculty Board under exceptional circumstances.
Digital tools authentic to the discipline and appropriate to the level of study and digital literacy are utilised for learning activities and assessment.
 
Students are supported to develop their digital literacy through resources, how-to guides and exemplars.
Holistic
Learning experiences build on and connect to students’ existing knowledges and skills; they foster wellbeing, selfdetermination and the development of capabilities that transform students into graduates who can achieve their goals.
Links to relevant student support services and resources are provided (e.g. mental health and wellbeing support, Disability Resource Centre, Library, academic language and student peer mentor support, DUSA student societies).
Regular updates in the Announcements provide supportive teacher presence and guide students’ learning journey throughout the unit
Specific support resources are integrated with learning activities in a timely and sequential manner.



Students are given an opportunity to introduce themselves and express their goals, enabling them to connect with others and foster a sense of belonging and wellbeing.
Integrated
Learning experiences are tailored to the discipline and study mode; digital and physical affordances complement each other and are sequenced across time, space and place to form an integrated whole that prepares students for the contemporary world.
Learning resources are presented in a coherent manner and consistent formats (e.g. file/link naming conventions) to foster self-directed learning.
Expectations on how students interact and learn in all spaces (digital and physical), across time (synchronous and asynchronous) and with diverse others (teachers, peers, industry and community) are clearly communicated.
Learning modes are flexible, authentic to the discipline, and prepare students for current and emerging practices.


Learning activities are designed and clearly integrated across time and space to allow students to achieve learning outcomes.

 
Feedback- focused
Learning experiences are underpinned by feedback designed to support students to achieve and evidence learning outcomes; feedback fosters dialogue that enables students to see their learning progress and develop evaluative judgements.
Actionable and appropriate feedback on assessments is provided to students to improve their future work.
 
Details of all assessment tasks are located in the '‘Assessment’ module and provided before a teaching period starts.
Summative assessment tasks, where relative and appropriate, have explicit assessment criteria and rubrics.
Students are encouraged to use and engage with rubrics and assessment criteria to understand standards and self-assess quality of their work.
Deakin provides assessment submission agreement for all assessment tasks through the use of University-wide html page template (reviewed annually).
Deakin provides students access to textmatching tools (Turnitin) to support and develop academic integrity.
Each week/module has self-check opportunities with explanatory feedback so students can check their understanding and monitor their own progress.
The University-wide html template for assessment is used for consistency wherever possible (reviewed annually).
Students’ evaluative judgement and feedback literacy are developed through the use of rubrics to peer-assess work or exemplars.


















 
Inclusive
Learning experiences are inclusive and accessible, they are flexible to provide choice in mode of study that is balanced with structure to support the development of a learning community.
Language is inclusive and clearly expressed, free of unnecessary jargon.
Digital learning resources and media (e.g. text, image, video, audio) represent diversity and inclusivity across cultural, religious, disability, sex/gender, sexual orientation, age and socio-economic dimensions.
The accessibility of digital resources meets the basic standard of Deakin’s Everyday Accessibility Framework (EAF) for learning and teaching, supported by the University wide html page template.
Deakin supports the use of alternative formats and multimodality for students with variable bandwidth.
Open Education Resources (i.e. learning materials that are free and digitally accessible) are the preferred choice. Links to learning resources are provided.
Links to lecture and seminar recordings are provided, where appropriate, in the ‘Class recordings’ module.
Professional and discipline specific terminology is scaffolded and defined in plain language.
Students are given the opportunity to produce artefacts and assessments with multimodal formats (e.g. texts, image, videos, audio).



Videos essential to student learning have captions (enabled with Kaltura and Zoom).






















 
Active & collaborative
Learning experiences are interactive, active & collaborative; students develop skills & knowledge through application activities that support the achievement of learning outcomes.
Learning activities include a guiding narrative enabling students to apply their learning and demonstrate their understanding.
Discussion and communication facilitate active and collaborative learning and encourage peer-to-peer interactions throughout the unit.
Students are given an opportunity to ask unit related questions and receive timely responses especially concerning assessment.
Students engage in peer learning activities and are encouraged to form professional learning networks.
Frequently asked questions and their answers are provided to all students.








 
Authentic
Learning experiences are reflective of our digitised lives and world of work; students use ideas, theories and tools relevant to contemporary contexts to solve meaningful problems and make an impact in a rapidly changing world.
Authentic and meaningful learning activities and assessment are designed and scaffolded within the unit.
The source of all learning resources is referenced to model discipline conventions and academic integrity. Copyright information is provided for all learning materials.
Assessments are informed by industry or community input, and address meaningful real world problems.






 
Course-wide
Learning experiences are constructively aligned and coherent across a course; a narrative clearly articulates the relationship between activities, assessment and outcomes to support student journeys from transition to graduation.
The role of the unit within the course or major, including the relevance of learning outcomes, activities and assessments, is explained.
Instructions for students to access course sites are provided; and course maps are linked to the unit site, where relevant and appropriate.
The unit learning experiences guide students’ achievement and evidencing of Course Learning Outcomes or professional competencies.





 

(80) For micro-units, the format and content of the unit site will be determined by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic, based on the unit requirements in clause 79.

 
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Section 6 - Academic Staff Qualifications and Equivalences Framework

(81) Staff with responsibilities for academic oversight or teaching and supervisory roles in courses or units will have appropriate qualifications or equivalent experience as set out in clause 85 (except as specified in clause 82 below). Such roles involve the exercise of academic judgement and include conducting classes or seminars, online course delivery or facilitation, summative assessment and laboratory demonstration.

(82) Staff without appropriate qualifications or experience may teach components of a course under the supervision of staff with appropriate qualifications or experience where they are employed:

  1. as professional specialists to meet particular education needs
  2. to teach as part of their career development or
  3. to teach in emergent academic disciplines and a plan to support their development, with appropriate timelines, is implemented.

(83) The criteria set out in clause 85 are applied in the context of the discipline and relevant course learning outcomes. The criteria may be varied or added to by the Faculty Board for particular courses as appropriate for the discipline or for individual staff members provided staff can demonstrate equivalence of professional or practiced-based experience (with reference to the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) criteria) and are equipped to meet students’ educational needs.

(84) Decisions about the equivalence of experience of staff are made by heads of academic units or associate heads teaching and learning (as nominees) on the advice of senior member/s of academic staff with expertise in the relevant discipline as appropriate.

(85) Evidence to support decisions about equivalence of experience under clause 83 might relate to (but is not limited to):

  1. experience in professional, business or creative or other practice-based roles requiring high order judgement and the provision of expert advice
  2. management of significant projects in the field
  3. testimonials, awards or other recognition that acknowledges leadership or expertise in the field
  4. professional qualifications, experience and standing, including participation in advisory boards and professional networks
  5. leadership in the development of professional standards
  6. design, creative or other practice-based technical achievements
  7. peer reviewed and other publications in the field or other publications such as books and reports
  8. leadership or management of research acknowledged by peers
  9. teaching experience and success
  10. scholarship.

Criteria for assessing appropriateness of qualifications and/or experience of staff overseeing or teaching in a course

(86) Note relating to equivalent experience: The assessment of equivalent experience will be made with reference to the course learning outcomes. The number of years of experience stipulated in the below table is indicative and may be varied as appropriate for particular disciplines or professions. What is considered to be ‘current experience’ will depend on the pace of change in a particular discipline or profession.

Course type Minimum qualification/experience to oversee or teach in course of this type
Level 6
Associate Degree
Advanced Diploma
Bachelor Degree in a relevant area (AQF Level 7)
No equivalence is recognised.
Level 7
Bachelor Degree
Bachelor Degree Honours, Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in a relevant area (AQF Level 8) OR
Bachelor Degree in a relevant area (AQF Level 7)

PLUS EITHER:
a. Typically 5 years current relevant professional, creative or other practice-based experience in a role/s requiring advanced knowledge, highly developed skills and independent planning and management of people, processes and/or projects OR
b. Typically 5 years current experience successfully teaching a course in a related area at Level 7 or above informed by scholarship in the discipline and teaching and learning practice.
Level 8
Graduate Certificate
Graduate Diploma
Bachelor Degree Honours (coursework units)
Masters Degree by coursework, (Extended) or (Research) in a relevant area (AQF Level 9) OR
Bachelor Degree Honours, Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in a relevant area (AQF Level 8)

PLUS EITHER:
a. Typically 5 years current relevant professional, creative or other practice-based experience in a role requiring specialised knowledge, expertise and independent high-level planning and management of people and/or complex processes/projects OR
b. Typically 5 years current experience successfully teaching a course in a related area at Level 8 or above informed by substantial scholarship in the discipline and teaching and learning practice.
Level 8
Bachelor Degree Honours (research methods units and supervision of research project)
Masters Degree (Research) in a relevant area (AQF Level 9) OR
Masters Degree by coursework or (Extended) (AQF Level 9) or Bachelor Degree Honours (AQF Level 8) in a relevant area
PLUS:
Current research experience in a relevant area equivalent to Master Degree (Research), to be determined with reference to evidence that might include independently peer-reviewed publications, research-related awards or prizes, professional reports, body of creative or other practice-based work and/or expert commentary.
Level 9
Masters Degree by coursework or (Extended) or coursework components of Masters Degrees (Research)
Doctoral Degree (Research) or (Professional) in a relevant area (AQF Level 10) OR
Masters Degree by coursework, (Extended) or (Research) (AQF Level 9)
PLUS EITHER:
a. For coursework components, extensive current experience practising as an expert in the relevant profession OR
b. For research and research training components, current research experience in a relevant area equivalent to a Doctoral Degree, to be determined with reference to evidence which might include independently peer-reviewed publications, research-related awards or prizes, professional reports, body of creative work and/or expert commentary.
Level 10
Doctoral Degree (Research)or (Professional) coursework components*
Doctoral Degree (Research) or (Professional) in a relevant area (AQF Level 10) OR
Masters Degree by coursework, (Extended) or (Research) (AQF Level 9)
PLUS EITHER:
a. For coursework components, extensive current experience practising as an expert in the relevant profession OR
b. For research projects (in addition to higher degrees by research theses) or research training components, current research experience in a relevant area equivalent to a Doctoral Degree to be determined with reference to evidence which might include independently peer-reviewed publications, research-related awards or prizes, professional reports, body of creative work and/or expert commentary.
*The qualifications required for supervisors of higher degrees by research theses are specified in the Higher Degrees by Research (HDR) Supervision procedure
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Section 7 - Definitions

(87) For the purposes of this Procedure:

  1. academic calendar: the schedule for each defined study period within an academic year.
  2. Academic Unit: as defined in the Research Conduct policy.
  3. academic year: the period from the first day of the study period of any year, to the day preceding the first day of the first study period of the following year, both inclusive.
  4. AQF: Australian Qualifications Framework.
  5. combined course: approved combination of courses of the University that leads to the conferral of two awards in accordance with regulation 17 – Combined Courses, Dual Courses and Joint Courses of the Academic Board Regulations.
  6. dual course: an approved combination of one or more courses developed collaboratively with a higher education provider in Australia or overseas leading to the separate conferral of an academic award by Deakin University and the partner provider in accordance with regulation 17 of the Academic Board Regulations.
  7. exit point: an early point of exit for students who choose not to complete the whole course in which they enrolled, and which provides an opportunity for students to exit with an award of a lower level if the student has met the requirements for that alternative award.
  8. faculty: includes any institute that is approved under University Regulations to offer courses.
  9. higher education award course: a course that leads to a higher education award of Deakin University including an award offered jointly with a partner institution.
  10. joint course: a single course arranged and delivered jointly by the University in conjuction with one or more higher education providers in Australia or overseas, leading to the conferral of a single academic award that is typically conferred jointly by the providers involved, in accordance with regulation 17 of the Academic Board Regulations.
  11. maximum period of study: the maximum period of time that may be taken by a student to complete a course of study in accordance with the Admission Process, Enrolment, Fees and Charges policy.
  12. micro-credential: an award made on completion of a micro-unit that warrants achievement of clearly articulated learning outcomes that is not sufficient, in itself, to lead to the award of a macro-credential.
  13. micro-unit: a type of unit with clearly articulated learning outcomes which are assessed and which leads to the award of a micro-credential.
  14. nested course: a course that is a complete subset of another higher level course.
  15. placement: a learning or assessment activity in a professional or business workplace or community setting or creative practice which may be paid or not-paid, in Australia or overseas, on-site or online and includes Deakin Interns, as well as higher degrees by research placements. Common terminology for student placements include: work-integrated learning, internships, industry based learning, clinical practice, teaching practicums, field education, professional experience, work experience and practical training.
  16. research: the creation of new knowledge and/or the use of existing knowledge in a new and creative way so as to generate new concepts, methodologies, inventions and understandings.
  17. research-related study: study about research rather than the conduct of research itself, such as a study of analytical techniques or experimental methods.
  18. research unit: a unit that requires a student to plan and conduct a piece of research with some independence.
  19. student workload: all teaching, learning and assessment activities that are required to be undertaken by the typical student to achieve the learning outcomes. These activities may include classes and seminars, self-paced learning, individual study, research, work-integrated learning experiences and assessment activities.
  20. study period: a defined teaching and study period specified by a faculty for the completion of units for a particular course.
  21. undergraduate early exit diploma: Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) 5 level diploma, available as an alternative exit point for students enrolled in selected undergraduate degrees, who have chosen not to continue with their studies and who meet the course rules for the relevant diploma.
  22. unit: a component of a course having a discrete designated code and title in which students enrol and complete specific work requirements.
  23. University Handbook: the official University publication containing details of courses, units and related information.
  24. work-integrated learning experience: includes any learning task or experience that is authentic (resembling what is expected of new graduates) and/or proximal (in relation to physical or digital workplaces, and professional contexts).